Spray Polyurethane Foam for Building Insulation Webinar

I was just reviewing plans for a YouthBuild USA project that together we will be renovating in Worchester, MA this year and I was struck by the reality that even in a rehab like this, we don’t use the same methods or systems for insulating that we traditionally have used.

Spray foam insulationWhen we insulate new or existing structures today there is no ‘one size fits all’. There is no one material that can be used in all places in a cost conscious manner. To be efficient and effective, we need to combine materials. One product that we reach for to control air leakiness in colder climates is spray foam insulation.

It’s important to understand the properties of spray foam if you are going to use them as part of a combined system to achieve the required performance. Before you choose a spray foam, get familiar with the material and how to combine it with other insulation products so that you can control heat flow without causing other problems.

If you are interested in learning more about spray foam insulations, I am conducting a webinar on this subject on Wednesday, April 23 from 3:00 – 4:00 PM EST. You can register right here. And this course qualifies for CEUs!

You will leave this webinar with the knowledge to:

  • Understand Polyurethanes Background – The History of Spray Foam Insulation -Insulation Applications
  • Compare the Differences of Spray Polyurethane Foam Insulation -Market Trends / Energy Efficiency Demands -SPF Overview -Open Cell / Closed Cell –Properties
  • Review Building Envelope Considerations
  • Distinguish the Differences Between Residential and Commercial Building Applications

Bring your questions – I will be ready!

 

The Art of Building Science Part II Webinar

Building Science fans, it’s time for Part II of the three part series on The Art of Building Science.  I hope that if you participated in the discussion last month on Heat Flow that you will join me for the next part of the series which will concentrate on Air Flow. If were not able to attend the first session that is not a problem.  These topics work collectively and individually.

The webinar will take place on Tuesday, April 8 from 5:30 – 7:00 pm EST to accommodate attendees who cannot participate during regular business hours.

I like to think of this as the second course of a three course meal. The webinar will run for 90 minutes so that we can consume the entrée part of this three course meal which is packed with valuable information and insight. We can’t eat the dessert until we finish the entrée.

Part II features a more in depth discussion on Air Flow and will provide you a deeper understanding of building science.  This session is approved for 1.5 AIA CEUs.

Register now, right here for The Art of Building Science Part II – Air Flow.

I look forward to continuing the dialogue on The Art of Building Science.

Understanding and Improving Indoor Air Quality Webinar

We, as a society, spend 90 percent of our time indoors. It is extremely important that the air inside our buildings, both residential and commercial, is providing the healthiest environment possible.

I will be hosting a webinar on Tuesday, April 8 from 3:00 – 4:00 pm EST on the topic of Understanding and Improving Air Quality.

This is a newly accredited program for us taking a deeper dive into the topic which is touched upon in other webinars that we have offer.  It is a more focused discussion on how to improve indoor air quality. 

We have talked about this topic and provided education on what indoor air quality is but this program will identify actual steps that can be taken to improve the quality of indoor air.

Let’s get together – inside – and explore the ways to improve our indoor air.  You can sign up right here for the webinar Understanding and Improving Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) – (GBCI Approved).

Come with questions and try to stump the presenter!

Tips for Inspecting Low or Steep Slope Roofing Systems

Two of the things you should do every spring and fall are clean your gutters and inspect your roof.  Whether it is a steep slope or low slope roof you need to get up close and inspect for any defects or damage to the roof system.  If you have the safety equipment and training then get up there  and do it but if you don’t, call your roofer and schedule a time for them to take a closer look for you.

This has been a rough winter – record snow and record cold in most parts of the country.  From the additional deflections that have occurred under that snow load to the extreme expansion and contractions that have taken place due to the wild temperature swings, our roofing systems have undergone more wear and tear than usual. 

So, before those legendary April showers begin, make sure your roof drainage is open and not blocked.  While you have someone up there, look for problems, look for failures, and look at where things meet and in the corners. A little bit of maintenance NOW can prevent a lot of tear-off later.

I will be presenting a webinar on Wednesday, March 26, at 2:00 pm EST on the topic of Self Adhering Membrane Roof Systems.  There are many types of systems with new techniques and products to make maintenance and replacement much easier and cost effective.

If you are in need of updated techniques and tips for your roofing systems, please join me for the webinar.

The Art of Building Science – Soup to Nuts Webinar Series

We are trying something new that we hope is helpful for those of you who would like to take a deeper dive into Building Science but can’t take time out of a nutty work day to do so.

Because I live Building Science every day, I occasionally lose sight of the fact that not everyone sees how all of this information works and fits together.  Sadly we live in a bullet point world so let’s give the big picture the opportunity to talk. Let’s give the silent masses the opportunity to ask questions and engage with folks who work with this knowledge on a daily basis in real world scenarios.

The early evening timeframe for this series may have particular value for younger architects and building professionals who do not get to take time out of billable hours but could jump online at the end of the day.

We are offering the opportunity to see the Big Picture of Building Science through a series of three webinars starting at 5:30 pm EST over the next three months that will take you through topics such as Heat Flow, Moisture Flow, Air Flow, Indoor Air Quality, Evaluating HVAC or Mechanical Systems in the Building Envelop and Sound Control Problems.

Be forewarned, each webinar is a half hour longer than the last.  It is like a three course meal that will leave you both full and wanting more.

The first session will be held on Wednesday, March 12 from 5:30 – 6:30 pm EST.  If you are looking to expand your knowledge of Building Science, this accredited course is for you!

Register and join me for The Art of Building Science Part I.

The Transparency Movement Sets a New Standard

Think about it, metrics for sustainability provide fact based defenses for faith based decisions. A Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) on an individual product is an example of a fact based defense for choosing a specific material.

For example, say that you set a criterion of global warming potential as your decision making criteri0n. How could you compare vastly different types of material to learn which has a greater impact? Now you can because the LCA provides that level of information. 

Now, if you look at sustainable buildings as opposed to sustainable materials the LCA is the natural way of taking the information and expanding it to the building level. Setting the correct discrete limits up front creates a potential for the limitless. We can take this same measurable – global warming potential – and expand it across the whole building assembly.  Can we say that this building is more sustainable than another?  Absolutely we can – the metrics are in place. Simply pick what is important to you.  After all, sustainability means different things to different people.

There are a whole range of important metrics that people can use in their consideration process. All the information is available and there are systems in place to be able to expand across the building such as the LCA.

So it is now possible to defend your faith in sustainability with facts; as long as you understand the systems like LCA and the information that is available.  Maybe faith is making a comeback.

What do you think?

 

Transparency and Green Labels for The Home

Product Life CycleWhile I was waiting for my coffee to brew this morning in the office, I started reading the ingredients on the back of the sweetener I planned to use. There was one ingredient that I didn’t recognize. Being a scientist, I am naturally curious so I looked it up. I was shocked to find out that the sweetener contained an ingredient that emits formaldehyde above 92 degrees Fahrenheit. So I chose a different sweetener.

How fortunate am I that I caught that and had the resources to understand what it was telling me. But how many people have no idea what some of this means? It made me think about the benefit and value of the emerging forms of transparency about the products that we buy and use in our homes. This information is very insightful and when we make it available in a form that people can digest and employ it has real value to customers and consumers.  An informed consumer is a better consumer and manufacturers are beginning to embrace the concept of transparency through Life Cycle Assessments, Environmental Product Declarations and Health Product Declarations. If you are interested in learning more about transparency in the building materials industry, I addressed this issue in a blog post.

For a more in depth and current discussion of the topic, please consider attending the webinar I am conducting on Tuesday, February 18 from 12:00 – 1:00 pm EST titled Publications for Product Life Cycle Assessment.  This course is accredited with the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and the Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI).

 

Freeze and Thaw of Winter Can Cause Problems for Your Roof

It’s been a crazy winter!  And we still have two months to go. Have you noticed all the potholes on the roads? Well, obviously, the potholes are the result of the freeze/thaw we have been going through.  The rapid swings in temperature can wreak havoc on the asphalt roads and cause them to fail.

imagesCA630XEYWhat’s the next biggest asphalt thing in your life?  It’s your roof.  Every time you see or don’t see and hit a pothole, think about your roof.  It might be worth the preventive maintenance to have a professional get up there and take a close look.  The continual heating/cooling can cause ice dams which occur when accumulated snow on a sloping roof melts and flows down the roof until it reaches an area cold enough and then refreezes, typically at the eaves. The ice formed in such a way often grows and “backs-up” the roof pushing its way under the shingles and damaging everything in its path. This is a situation that you want to identify early.

If you have a professional look at your roof and need to make repairs or replace your roof choose your installer very carefully.  A roof that is installed improperly will not be covered by a manufacturer’s warranty. Make sure you choose an installer who not only is very experienced but is also credentialed by the manufacturer whose product they install. Very often you can find credentialed contractors at the manufacturer’s website. While there, why not also look for contractors who participate in “take-back” programs to divert your old roof from going into a landfill.

Remember, whether you dodge or ford those potholes, they might actually be doing you a favor by reminding you to think about your roof.

Wall Assemblies for Maximum Efficiency: How Many Layers is Too Many?

SimplexOPTIMABuilding professionals spend a lot of time dealing with production construction which has dialed in efficiencies and productivity to provide the maximum assembly for the cost per square foot.  The reality is in standard construction you build things in five or six layers. This is the standard in terms of building a wall system more efficiently and we have gotten it down to a science.  Generally a six layer home will give you a solid, energy efficient, comfortable home.

Occasionally, I work with builders on projects that remind me of possibilities beyond what is the status quo.  I recently had an opportunity to work with a builder who was building a custom home whose wall systems had 13 layers.  This wall had so much redundancy and robustness built into it that I just had to ask for a chance to visit the project and see this masterpiece being built.

This was the homeowner’s instruction: They wanted a thick wall, they wanted a silent wall, they wanted a highly efficient wall for them to own.  That’s one of the key’s to this discussion- the owner is focused on what comes afterwards- not what happened before. To achieve this goal the builder is employing a combination of traditional masonry materials and cutting edge products and systems.   

In a similar fashion, a project that CertainTeed has been involved with at the Navy Yard in Philadelphia with Penn State achieves a similar goal but in a lighter and perhaps less massive assembly – to create a highly efficient wall system that can provide comfort, improve indoor air quality, better acoustics but, and here’s the rub- to still be affordable by more typical consumers.  This was done by using a 2 x 8 construction – providing a deeper wall cavity – A Blown-in-Blanket Insulation System, Weather Resistant Barrier, a Smart Vapor Retarder and Air Barrier System, a Wallboard Solution, Rigid Insulation on exterior and Insulated Vinyl Siding. This created an R30.5 exterior wall.

In both homes, products were used to address acoustics, indoor air quality and moisture control.  Do you need 13 layers?  Probably not but the pressure is certainly going to be on what layers remain to do more than they have in the past.

Thoughts?

 

Can We Pick Our Future Rather Than Repeating Our Past?

The U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Version 4 (V4) has been approved and will be become official at the Greenbuild International Conference and Expo in November 2013.  But even after the new version comes out in November, you can register and begin LEED 2009 projects up until the summer of 2015.  This means that for the next two years we will have LEED 2009 projects coexisting beside LEED V4 projects.

These programs are very different especially with regard to transparency issues.  For example, Health Product Declarations (HPD’s), Environmental Product Declarations (EPD’s) and Life Cycle Assessments (LCA’s) are moved in V4 from where they were in LEED 2009. In LEED 2009 they are classified as pilot libraries but now have been moved to materials and resources, credits two, three, and four. This represents a significant change to the materials and resources credits.

The co-existence of two different programs could, potentially, cloud the issues for the end users.  But making incremental steps can help to keep people focused on a sustainable future without feeling that they have to start all over. But does the potential exist for the momentum of LEED to stall because we are not looking far enough into the future?

Consider the Living Building Challenge which is the gold standard for what some advocates envision for the sustainable future. Have they thrown the target so far down the field that it doesn’t need to be continually updated because the goals are not highly achievable today? It sets the bar very high but it does give us a long range goal for future development.

If you want to change the future you can’t do it based upon the past.  Psychologists tell us that our default reaction to a challenge is based on our experience and history. When presented with a situation we tend to lean on the past.  This causes us to repeat the past and impedes our ability to get to a desired better future.

If you want to get to a future that is different than the past, you have to imagine a future not based on the past.  You have to set your target not based on incremental changes because that just builds on the past.  Let’s start by saying “in 10 years, I want to be over there”- now work back from there until now and NOT forward from now until then. I think you’ll find that you end up much closer to where you want to be this new way than you did with the old way.

I, for one, would not want to see our efforts to move toward energy efficient, sustainable buildings stalled or worse, abandoned, because we failed to see a clear path to that future. If we get too caught up in the process, we could lose sight of the purpose.