An Insight from Green Building Guru: David Gottfried

GottfriedAt Greenbuild 2013, we were thrilled to welcome David Gottfried, the founder of the U.S. Green Building Council to our exhibit. His visit coincided with the launch of his newest book, “Explosion Green”. In this excerpt from Building Design + Construction magazine, David offers the following advice to green building professionals:

Don’t give up. We started with nothing — no money, no board, no brochure, no green building rating system. A lot of people did not take us seriously. However, we were able to collect those who had passion, a spirit for change and wanted a bigger purpose in life. And then, we supported each other when mountain climbing got steep and we kept at it. We found our way and invented the fasting growing industry for changing earth and the economy…and built a core around the world of millions of people. Stay the course and don’t give up…

Well said, Mr. Gottfried. We agree and look forward to reading your new book!

An Insight from CertainTeed Green Guru Mike Bottoms

I asked CertainTeed Green Guru Mike Bottoms, Solar Sales Manager the following questiongreenbuild-nation-20x20:

If you had the ability to change one thing about the way we construct homes and buildings what would it be?

I would like to see all homes have a solar array. It would not only cut down on the stress on the  infrastructure of the grid, but would also improve the lifestyles of people by lowering utility bills and give them more independent from the utility companies. The challenge we face currently is that solar is still very connected to rebates and incentives.  As the utility rates go up and incentives go down we will reach parity at some point.  Right now we are more dependent on rebates so I would like to see those be more permanent and consistent state to state.

Greenbuild 60-Second Stopby: Kohler

KohlerTolietOne of the best hands-on demonstrations I saw at Greenbuild this year was the Kohler Toliet Tour (Booth #401). There were a wide array of functional toilets on display that showcased performance benefits such as the amount of waste that can be removed; glazing that enhances cleanliness; and, water-saving features. According to Kohler, the demonstration in the picture above tests the exchange of water in the bowl in conjunction with light waste removal. In layman’s terms, a cup of plastic beads are dropped in the bowl. If the toilet is flushed and more than 125 beads remain in the bowl, then the toilet is not up to par. In this case, only one bead remained, so the toilet had passed with flying colors. If these experiments peak your interest, you can get ongoing updates by following the hashtag #KohlerTolietTour.

An Insight from CertainTeed Green Guru Bob Marshall

greenbuild-nation-20x20I asked the following question to CertainTeed Green Guru Bob Marshall, Manager, Marketing Technical Services for Ceilings:

If you had the ability to change one thing about the way we construct homes and buildings what would it be?

Since my interest is primarily with commercial construction, I would say it would be a higher level of attention to the acoustic environment in buildings. It has such great power to effect the way that humans work in an office facility, how well they learn in educational facilities and how well they recover in a healthcare facility. There are volumes of academic research to support these very obvious connections. What is helpful to us now is that LEEDv4 has actually placed points available for effective acoustic design in just about every relevant point system that is part of the new rating system.

Greenbuild 60-Second Stopby: Davies Office

homebanner-Custom-Private-OfficeIf you are in the midst of a major office remodel, refurbishing your existing furniture might be easier than you think — and save you money. A quick stop by the Davies Office exhibit (#2837) included a radical transformation of outdated office furniture into a modern, colorful workspace. With a 40-year track record, Davies Office continues to help companies significantly reduce their environmental impact. For example, a recent project for Computer Science Corporation in Falls Church, Va., resulted in initial savings of $250,000 in warehousing cost, 346,822 pounds of waste material diverted from landfills and 1,005,784 pounds of raw material conserved. If you’re at the Greenbuild Expo, it’s definitely worth a stop by!

Greenbuild 60-Second Stopby: BioNova Natural Pools

BioNovaThe BioNova Natural Pool (booth #725) is a new innovation created by BioNova. The swimming area and the planted regeneration area are completely separated. The waste-water is treated in a biological way without using chemicals, so you can swim and bath in absolutely natural, vivid water. The water quality is as high as in the natural pre-Alpine lakes. Even on smaller properties you can now realize your dream of your own Natural Pool according to what I learned.

The BioNova Pool requires less space than other Natural Swimming Pools, because they place the technology underground. Additionally a planted soil filter replaces the regeneration area. This NSP blends harmoniously with every garden! And last but not least: there’s a huge cost advantage in comparison with traditional Swimming Pool. It is a great fit for the hotel and wellness sectors.

Worth a visit!

Greenbuild 60-Second Stopby: Bike Lid

Screen shot 2013-11-21 at 8.28.58 AMAccording to the New York City Department of Transportation, the main reason people do not ride a bike to work is lack of secure, long-term parking. As a result, companies such as Bike Lid (booth #4240) are bringing new products into the marketplace to help change this perception.

Bike Lid offers a unique alternative for bike storage — a durable  “clam shell” design with industrial spring-loaded hinges. Its easy for bikers to use and even more easy to maintain since the lids are resistant to graffiti, scratches, rust and dents. An added benefit? Their sleek design can offers revenue potential, with plenty of surface real estate for sponsors and advertisers.

Greenbuild 60-Second Stopby: Rainwater Collection Systems – The Original Rainwater Pillow

DSCN2768The Original Rainwater Pillow (booth # 1121) is a large volume rainwater/storm water harvesting system designed to be stored in horizontal wasted space above grade.  They can create custom pillows up to 200,000 gallons. Systems can be developed for residential, commercial and industrial applications.  Typically the water is collected off of the roof and goes to a pre-filter which removes asphalt and other particles. Systems are available for potable and non-potable applications.

The Pillows can be stored under a deck or crawlspace in a residential setting. For commercial or industrial settings, the system can be stored in a basement or a parking garage.

The water can be used for irrigation, flushing toilets, laundry, drinking water and much more.

Well worth a Stopby!

An Insight from Our Green Guru Lucas Hamilton

greenbuild-nation-20x20I asked Lucas Hamilton, Manager, Building Science Applications for CertainTeed the following question: 

If you could change one thing about the way we construct homes and buildings, what would it be?

It would be the fact that our financial model or the way we value properties today does not reward long term sustainable construction practices.  Lenders are not considering the life cycle of the building in their lending decisions.  Providing for upfront costs for measures that could make the building more efficient over a lifetime are not taken into consideration.

We need to create financial models for borrowing and building that are based upon a life cycle assessment  that truly rewards the  permanent installation of energy saving and sustainable materials and systems.

LEEDv4: Empowering Consumers through Greater Product Transparency?

HPDLogoThis week, I’m in downtown Philadelphia for Greenbuild 2013, which attracts more than 30,000 building and design professionals from around the world. The event also serves as the platform for the official launch of the U.S. Green Building Council’s new LEED®v4 standard, which calls for further environmental transparency in the built environment. While much of the buzz around LEEDv4 is within the green building community, I believe that the average consumer will benefit greatly from these new standards. Why? Because increased transparency translates into a more empowered consumer base.

Take the food industry as an example. For the most part, today’s consumers are label readers and are increasingly conscious of what is deemed healthy and what is not. They are demanding more disclosure of food ingredients such as trans fat. They are thinking twice about eating foods that are impossible to pronounce. They are the reason that most super markets have growing in-store real estate dedicated to organic foods.

How can we harness this energy and apply it to the physical environment where we live, work and play? I believe that Health Product Declarations (HPDs), which play a key role in LEEDv4, are a great start. HPDs comprehensively report information about the health impacts of each ingredient used to manufacture a building product. With this, architects, designers and contractors — as well as end users and consumers­— will be equipped with valuable information about their surroundings.

Not yet familiar with HPDs? Check out www.hpdcollaborative.org or visit www.ctpressroom.com to learn more about CertainTeed’s industry-first HPDs for its ceiling products.