Free Continuing Education Webinar: Acoustical Ceilings for the Eye, the Ear and the Mind

CTC_TCH_case study_409x240Unwanted noise in interior spaces can profoundly impact the way people work, learn and heal in the built environment. Well-designed interior spaces are key to combating this serious problem. Choosing the right ceiling panel material for a project makes a huge difference in managing the acoustical response of a room.

Studies also show that natural light that is more evenly distributed in a room can increase productivity. Ceilings manufactured with light reflectance properties can have a positive impact on the comfort of a room and decrease electrical costs.

To learn more, join our Building Knowledge Academy of Continuing Education (ACE) this Tuesday, December 16, from 1 – 2 p.m. ET, for a free educational webinar on acoustical ceilings. The course provides an overview of the principles of sound attenuation and light reflectance and can count toward CEU credits.

Robert Marshall, Manager for Marketing Technical Services for CertainTeed Ceilings, who has extensive experience with acoustical ceilings as a private contractor and now in the manufacturing sector, will lead the webinar. During this engaging discussion, you will learn:

  • The main properties of acoustical ceilings, their function and performance, and how they are tied to positive outcomes in healthcare facilities, schools and places of business.
  • How to calculate the Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) when determining the acoustical performance of a product and compare acoustical materials as they relate to sound absorption and frequency.
  • The Luminous Reflectance Factor of acoustical materials as it relates to sustainable work environments.

Click here to register.

The CertainTeed Building Knowledge ACE program offers the industry’s most extensive and engaging collection of CEU courses available. Its breadth of educational courses provides architects, specifiers and others in the building industry with knowledge and skills needed to specify products smarter.

We hope you will join us for this informative session.

Green Thought Leader Helen Sanders, vice president, Technical Business Development, Sage Electrochromics

While at Greenbuild 2014, we asked our technical thought leaders the following question:

What is the most compelling thing happening in your universe with regard to sustainability?

Helen_Sanders_cropFor me the most compelling thing with regard to sustainability is the recognition of the human impact of day light. It is important for buildings to allow enough day light in but not to the point of being uncomfortable for the people inside. Day light is good for your health. It has been scientifically proven that if you don’t have enough day light at the right times of the day it can have significant health impacts such as increases in cancers, weight gain and mood disorders.

The design of buildings for the admission of day light is a 21st century imperative. We’ve got to try to design our buildings differently. In the 70’s and 80’s we started to build these massive footprints of buildings where very few people could be near a window. We did that because electricity was inexpensive so it allowed us to build bigger. Now we are seeing the downside of that from a health perspective. We’ve got to start doing something different with our building design to improve and harnass day light.

Green Thought Leaders – Robert Marshall, manager, marketing technical services, CertainTeed Ceilings

While at Greenbuild 2014, we asked our technical thought leaders the following question:

What is the most compelling thing happening in your universe with regard to sustainability?

I think the most compelling thing is the marketing of transparency. Five years ago all the issues that we talk about in transparency, had we had them at that point in time, we couldn’t have given this information away.  But today because of the inclusion in LEED, the references to transparency that are now part of Version 4, everybody we go to visit, either knows about it and wants to know if we have it or has heard about it and wants us to tell them about it.

It has opened up a whole new avenue for us. For CertainTeed and Saint-Gobain, we have a corporate-wide movement toward a transparency that is unprecedented from a global perspective that will trickle down to all our divisions.  At some point, there will be Life Cycle Assessments, Certified Environmental Product Declarations and Health Product Declarations that will be part and parcel of everything that we sell.

A Sustainable Behemoth Part II – Quantifying the Recycling of Removed Materials During Deconstruction

DSCN3647This is the second blog in a series I am doing about the construction of our new headquarters which will be a ‘living lab’ for our products.

Work on our new headquarters in Malvern, PA is moving extremely fast.  I would say faster than any of us thought possible. The exterior glass is being installed on the building and the goal of being ‘under roof’ before winter is certainly within our reach.

But before we could install the new exterior with Saint-Gobain glass products, the deconstruction of the building needed to take place and all of the materials coming off the building that can be recycled needed to be cataloged.

The building is being built to several different sustainability standards, including LEED, most of which require that we make an accurate accounting of the recycling efforts going into the deconstruction phase.  All the glass and steel, as it comes off the building, needs to be quantified and accounted for.  This information will be used for validation of our goals for recycling the existing building.

The speed, accuracy and the accounting for all the materials that can be recycled was simply amazing given the size of the building. This was not only done quickly but cleanly.

Phase I complete!

If you are attending Greenbuild this week stop by our booth #1413 and see this project, the products and speak to the architects and technical staff working on the building.

Greenbuild 2014 Erupts in New Orleans

DSCN3691Welcome to Greenbuild 2014 in New Orleans. The Big Easy is better than ever and a great place to show off the progress being made, through strategic partnerships, to bring sustainable living to a part of the city still recovering from Hurricane Katrina. The Saint-Gobain family of businesses has been involved in several projects here in New Orleans which will be discussed over the next few days in this blog.

CertainTeed (booth #1413), our parent company Saint-Gobain and our sister businesses SAGE Electrochromics and Saint-Gobain ADFORS are part of a ’village’ of exhibits. Products and expertise that inspires are at the core of what we have brought to Greenbuild this year and we are eager to share them with you.

Saint-Gobain North America and CertainTeed are in the process of building a new headquarters outside of Philadelphia, PA. Using products that we manufacture, we are building a LEED building that will address the challenges of acoustics, indoor environmental quality, and daylighting issues. We refer to our headquarters project as a ‘living lab.’

If you are attending Greenbuild you can see these products and systems and speak with our technical experts working on this project over the next few days.

If you are not attending Greenbuild come back to our blog to learn more about our initiatives and other cool products that are on display at the show.

A Sustainable Behemoth in the Making – The Saint-Gobain/CertainTeed New Headquarters

Image 01There is an old saying “You can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.”  Well, that is exactly what Saint-Gobain and CertainTeed are doing at our new headquarters in Malvern, PA.

This is a very exciting time for our Company as we ‘walk the talk’ when it comes to sustainability and performance of our own products.  We are engaged in a full renovation of a building that was the former home of a large insurance company but has been vacant for a decade..  With our building products we are transforming the building – inside and out – to a state-of-the-art sustainable, living laboratory for our products and systems that should qualify as USGBC LEED Gold.

Because this is our building it gives us the opportunity to practice all the things that we preach on a daily basis to the market about our products. This is an opportunity to create our environment, live in it and monitor how our products perform. It is also an opportunity for all of our sister businesses to come together and address challenges such as indoor air quality, managing office acoustics, daylighting issues and overall comfort throughout the work day.

This project has generated a great deal of excitement for all our employees and we will have a great deal to talk about over the next year in our blogs because it is a living, breathing example of building sustainably with sustainable materials and with an eye on the future.

There is no other building on the planet that will have this unique suite of dynamic products all working together to make a material difference in how we work so we can help others change the places where they work.

I hope you will check back frequently, follow our journey, along with the pains and woes that all people go through when building a building sustainably.  It should be educational and fun!

 

Sights to See While at AIA 2014

PoetryFoundationWhile there are a myriad of noteworthy buildings and architectural tours in Chicago, we turned to architecture critic for the Chicago Tribune, Blair Kamin, for a curated list of sights to see while in town. A Pulitzer prize-winning journalist, Kamin was a featured speaker at the Architect Live exhibit at the 2014 AIA Expo. His top recommendations include:

  • The Poetry Foundation building by John Ronan Architects
  • The Aqua tower by Studio Gang Architects
  • The Modern Wing at the Art Institute of Chicago by Renzo Piano
  • The Sullivan Center, formerly referred to as the Carson Pirie Scott Building, by Louis Henri Sullivan

Other notable projects underway include plans by legendary film director George Lucas for a Star Wars museum and the Barack Obama presidential library. Seems like we should add another visit to Chicago in our travel plans. What are your favorite buildings in the Windy City?

A Celebration of Architecture

 

Eaton Center

Eaton Center

Architects are like invisible magicians. They add long-lasting intrigue, beauty, comfort and convenience to our surroundings, yet the impact of their work is rarely a topic of daily discussion. Our fast-paced lives keep us mired in chaotic schedules and to-do lists that might preclude the diurnal appreciation of our surroundings — all the more reason to take a minute and take note of National Architecture Week, April 6-12.

Spearheaded by The American Institute of Architects, National Architecture Week is an annual commemoration that aligns with the birthday of our nation’s first architect, Thomas Jefferson. It’s designed to recognize the talent and innovation of architects along with the positive contributions they make in our communities. There’s a number of ways to get involved:

  • Follow #archweek14 on Twitter. Upload pictures of your favorite home or building and add comments to posts that grab your attention.
  • Visit the CertainTeed Facebook page to see our curated list of favorite projects.

And, for ongoing inspiration — well beyond National Architecture Week — we highly recommend Architizer for its amazing photography. Of course, you are always welcome and encouraged to spend time here on our blog — we like to hear your inspirational stories all year round!

Acoustics – Designing Classrooms for Optimal Learning

Santa Monica Public LibraryWhat impact can you as the designer bring to a classroom setting given that you are not going to be teaching?  One of the things you potentially bring is the ability to impact the environmental acoustical value of the space.

The 21st Century classroom is a more diverse place than ever before. With the mainstreaming of children with learning disabilities, physical challenges and language barrier issues, it is more important than ever to have an acoustically efficient environment. To create a design which does not addresses the lowest common denominator just seems wrong.

This gives students a better chance of staying engaged. It is especially critical where younger students are concerned (K-5). They do not yet have the skills to fill in the words that are lost when listening to the teacher in a less-than-adequate acoustic environment.

I worked in ceiling construction earlier in my career and built hundreds of school classrooms knowing all the while that they were poorly designed spaces accountable only to the installed cost per square foot. I then moved into working with the architectural community in an effort to bring a better focus on the power of and necessity for efficient acoustic design. I have observed through numerous academic studies that the attention to acoustic design in classrooms has a significant impact on learning for all students; but especially early learners. I was also afforded the opportunity to observe this need for acoustic design close-up as the parent of an autistic child attending a public school.

Thanks to LEED taking an active part in acoustics and environmental design, this topic is now required for certification in a LEED for Schools project. It is our responsibility as designers, specifiers and advocates to put a human face on the critical importance of this topic.

I will be teaching a webinar on Classroom Acoustics on Tuesday, March 11, from 12:00 – 1:00 pm. I will cover issues such as: Signal to noise ratio – reverberation time – speech intelligibility testing – how all these metrics and academic testing have shown that a quieter environment is a better learning environment – and more. 

If this is a topic of interest to you, take advantage of this free webinar by registering here: Ceilings: Classroom Acoustics (GBCI Approved)

 

Wall Assemblies for Maximum Efficiency: How Many Layers is Too Many?

SimplexOPTIMABuilding professionals spend a lot of time dealing with production construction which has dialed in efficiencies and productivity to provide the maximum assembly for the cost per square foot.  The reality is in standard construction you build things in five or six layers. This is the standard in terms of building a wall system more efficiently and we have gotten it down to a science.  Generally a six layer home will give you a solid, energy efficient, comfortable home.

Occasionally, I work with builders on projects that remind me of possibilities beyond what is the status quo.  I recently had an opportunity to work with a builder who was building a custom home whose wall systems had 13 layers.  This wall had so much redundancy and robustness built into it that I just had to ask for a chance to visit the project and see this masterpiece being built.

This was the homeowner’s instruction: They wanted a thick wall, they wanted a silent wall, they wanted a highly efficient wall for them to own.  That’s one of the key’s to this discussion- the owner is focused on what comes afterwards- not what happened before. To achieve this goal the builder is employing a combination of traditional masonry materials and cutting edge products and systems.   

In a similar fashion, a project that CertainTeed has been involved with at the Navy Yard in Philadelphia with Penn State achieves a similar goal but in a lighter and perhaps less massive assembly – to create a highly efficient wall system that can provide comfort, improve indoor air quality, better acoustics but, and here’s the rub- to still be affordable by more typical consumers.  This was done by using a 2 x 8 construction – providing a deeper wall cavity – A Blown-in-Blanket Insulation System, Weather Resistant Barrier, a Smart Vapor Retarder and Air Barrier System, a Wallboard Solution, Rigid Insulation on exterior and Insulated Vinyl Siding. This created an R30.5 exterior wall.

In both homes, products were used to address acoustics, indoor air quality and moisture control.  Do you need 13 layers?  Probably not but the pressure is certainly going to be on what layers remain to do more than they have in the past.

Thoughts?