Free Continuing Education Webinar: Acoustical Ceilings for the Eye, the Ear and the Mind

CTC_TCH_case study_409x240Unwanted noise in interior spaces can profoundly impact the way people work, learn and heal in the built environment. Well-designed interior spaces are key to combating this serious problem. Choosing the right ceiling panel material for a project makes a huge difference in managing the acoustical response of a room.

Studies also show that natural light that is more evenly distributed in a room can increase productivity. Ceilings manufactured with light reflectance properties can have a positive impact on the comfort of a room and decrease electrical costs.

To learn more, join our Building Knowledge Academy of Continuing Education (ACE) this Tuesday, December 16, from 1 – 2 p.m. ET, for a free educational webinar on acoustical ceilings. The course provides an overview of the principles of sound attenuation and light reflectance and can count toward CEU credits.

Robert Marshall, Manager for Marketing Technical Services for CertainTeed Ceilings, who has extensive experience with acoustical ceilings as a private contractor and now in the manufacturing sector, will lead the webinar. During this engaging discussion, you will learn:

  • The main properties of acoustical ceilings, their function and performance, and how they are tied to positive outcomes in healthcare facilities, schools and places of business.
  • How to calculate the Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC) when determining the acoustical performance of a product and compare acoustical materials as they relate to sound absorption and frequency.
  • The Luminous Reflectance Factor of acoustical materials as it relates to sustainable work environments.

Click here to register.

The CertainTeed Building Knowledge ACE program offers the industry’s most extensive and engaging collection of CEU courses available. Its breadth of educational courses provides architects, specifiers and others in the building industry with knowledge and skills needed to specify products smarter.

We hope you will join us for this informative session.

Green Thought Leader Helen Sanders, vice president, Technical Business Development, Sage Electrochromics

While at Greenbuild 2014, we asked our technical thought leaders the following question:

What is the most compelling thing happening in your universe with regard to sustainability?

Helen_Sanders_cropFor me the most compelling thing with regard to sustainability is the recognition of the human impact of day light. It is important for buildings to allow enough day light in but not to the point of being uncomfortable for the people inside. Day light is good for your health. It has been scientifically proven that if you don’t have enough day light at the right times of the day it can have significant health impacts such as increases in cancers, weight gain and mood disorders.

The design of buildings for the admission of day light is a 21st century imperative. We’ve got to try to design our buildings differently. In the 70’s and 80’s we started to build these massive footprints of buildings where very few people could be near a window. We did that because electricity was inexpensive so it allowed us to build bigger. Now we are seeing the downside of that from a health perspective. We’ve got to start doing something different with our building design to improve and harnass day light.

Green Thought Leader – Lucas Hamilton, manager, Building Science Applications

While at Greenbuild 2014, we asked our technical thought leaders the following question:

What is the most compelling thing happening in your universe with regard to sustainability?

Lucas Hamilton

Lucas Hamilton

Lucas Hamilton: The most compelling thing for me is transparency and transparency documentation. I think it is one of the coolest things going on because it drives human behavior. It drives consumer behavior because now they have a chance to choose materials that they can get information on and it drives manufacturer behavior because when you have to show the world what you are doing you are more inclined to make positive changes with regard to the impact you are having on the environment. It pushes and pulls and does it for all the right reasons and without mandate. It uses the best part of our human nature on both sides. I think five years from now we will look back and see just how much of an impact is has made on how we make and purchase products.

Hoteliers Take Heed: LEED is Good for Business

BlogA recent study published by the Cornell University School of Hotel Administration provides empirical evidence that LEED-certified hotels make more money per room than non-certified competitors.

The U.S. Green Building Council’s (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system has guided the building industry’s turn toward sustainable design since 2000. From its inception, the question has never been is LEED good for the environment. That’s a given. The question has always been is LEED good for business. Certainly the hotel industry has already embraced sustainable design to varying degrees, but evidence supporting its business practicality will surely spur on future green efforts.

What Cornell researchers did for this study was compare the performance of 93 LEED-certified hotels to that of 514 comparable non-certified competitors and found that those certified had higher average daily rates and revenue per available room, at least for two years following the certification.

This is interesting news for the hotel industry. Until now there has been little data linking LEED certification to business performance. The Cornell University study’s findings mesh with McGraw-Hill’s 2013 Green Retail and Hospitality report, which looked at annual operating costs, asset value, and ROI. This data, coupled with USGBC’s new LEED scorecard specific to the hotel industry, could bring forth lasting change toward sustainably designed hotels.

As the manufacturer of a complete portfolio of gypsum board, insulation and finishing products, we share the responsibility to help hotels meet LEED credits. That’s why we offer building materials that allow hotels to effectively address important environmental issues like indoor air quality, thermal performance and acoustics.

It’s our perspective that the Cornell study will serve as a catalyst for hoteliers to support the construction of sustainably built hotels. The proof is in the Cornell report, the guidance is in the LEED scorecard, and the products are on the market. Seems like now is a good time for hotels to go green.

Don’t Risk Missing Points in LEED V4

LEEDv4If I put on my promotion hat on for a minute, I urge anyone using LEED to be aware of the transparency reporting changes between LEED 2009 and LEED V4. Both reward transparency points but in LEED 2009 they are found under the pilot libraries but in LEED V4 they are migrated down to materials and resources credits.

Since both programs will be in play until mid- 2015, it is important to know where to properly apply these transparency points from manufacturers that provide transparency documentation.

You can be awarded up to six points for transparency so, believe me, this is not something that you want to walk past these because it can cost you a fortune to make up six points somewhere else.

If you need to know the differences between LEED 2009 and LEED V4, I am running a webinar entitled Understanding LEED 2009 v. LEED Version 4on Tuesday, May 6 at 2:00 pm EST. My webinars are free of charge and qualify for AIA and GBCI credits.

In the spirit of transparency, I will cover the following objectives:

  • Identify key improvements in LEED version 4 compared to LEED 2009. Describe new credits applicable to building products and their requirements
  • Understand the new importance of products with Environmental Product Declarations (EPDs), Health Product Declarations (HPDs), and Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) programs
  •  Identify products that improve energy performance, acoustics, daylight, waste management, and thermal comfort
  • Explain the importance of selecting low emitting products and materials to meet updated credit requirements

If you build for LEED, you won’t want to miss this session.

Small is Beautiful in this Contemporary Cabin from Simplex Homes

When you start to think about downsizing  you may want to consider modular construction if you are building.  At Greenbuild this year, the Green Zone exhibited a wonderful option.Simplex House

The Greenbuild Cabin, designed by Resolution:4 Architecture and built by Simplex Homes, was an excellent example of more efficient living similar to the types of residential options you would see at the Solar Decathlon.  Attendees at Greenbuild could see products at work in a modular one-room retreat that was aesthetically very pleasing.

The 806-square-foot cabin is designed to have a strong connection to the exterior, with abundant natural lighting achieved through low-e, Argonne-filled, double-pane glass. With a LEED Platinum certification as the goal, the cabin employs a number of green technologies, including rainwater collection, a greywater system, photovoltaic array, EPDM rubber membrane roofing system and a super-insulated envelope.

The cabin houses a fully functional kitchen and, through its creative use of space and natural lighting, invites residents to live large.  

Lessons Learned at the GreenZone Pedia-Pod

Screen shot 2013-11-26 at 11.29.23 AMAt Greenbuild 2013, Building Design + Construction magazine delivered a life-size GreenZone Pedia-Pod to the show, where more than 30,000 attendees had the opportunity to explore this unique facility. The 14×42-foot module was fabricated by NRB of Ephrata, Penn., using a permanent modular construction technique. CertainTeed was proud to included in the stringent sustainable product specifications, which included Sustainable Insulation, AirRenew IAQ Gypsum Board and Symphony Ceiling Panels.

While touring the facility, I also gleaned several eye-opening insights on healthcare design and construction trends:

Constant exposure to indoor lighting can impact children’s eyes — which are still developing. Patient controlled lighting or lighting that mimics a circadian rhythm can result in a better healing environment;

Patient rooms are becoming more family-centric by incorporating flexible furniture solutions. In the GreenZone Pedia-Pod, this was accomplished by the a wall of library shelving that rotated to reveal a hidden bed that would allow parents to stay with a sick child; and,

Modular medical units can offer more flexibility in providing care to the community, since they can efficiently be deconstructed and relocated.

If you missed the exhibit at Greenbuild, check out www.bdcnetwork.com/greenzone2013 to see photos and learn more about the project.

An Insight from Green Building Guru: David Gottfried

GottfriedAt Greenbuild 2013, we were thrilled to welcome David Gottfried, the founder of the U.S. Green Building Council to our exhibit. His visit coincided with the launch of his newest book, “Explosion Green”. In this excerpt from Building Design + Construction magazine, David offers the following advice to green building professionals:

Don’t give up. We started with nothing — no money, no board, no brochure, no green building rating system. A lot of people did not take us seriously. However, we were able to collect those who had passion, a spirit for change and wanted a bigger purpose in life. And then, we supported each other when mountain climbing got steep and we kept at it. We found our way and invented the fasting growing industry for changing earth and the economy…and built a core around the world of millions of people. Stay the course and don’t give up…

Well said, Mr. Gottfried. We agree and look forward to reading your new book!

LEEDv4: Empowering Consumers through Greater Product Transparency?

HPDLogoThis week, I’m in downtown Philadelphia for Greenbuild 2013, which attracts more than 30,000 building and design professionals from around the world. The event also serves as the platform for the official launch of the U.S. Green Building Council’s new LEED®v4 standard, which calls for further environmental transparency in the built environment. While much of the buzz around LEEDv4 is within the green building community, I believe that the average consumer will benefit greatly from these new standards. Why? Because increased transparency translates into a more empowered consumer base.

Take the food industry as an example. For the most part, today’s consumers are label readers and are increasingly conscious of what is deemed healthy and what is not. They are demanding more disclosure of food ingredients such as trans fat. They are thinking twice about eating foods that are impossible to pronounce. They are the reason that most super markets have growing in-store real estate dedicated to organic foods.

How can we harness this energy and apply it to the physical environment where we live, work and play? I believe that Health Product Declarations (HPDs), which play a key role in LEEDv4, are a great start. HPDs comprehensively report information about the health impacts of each ingredient used to manufacture a building product. With this, architects, designers and contractors — as well as end users and consumers­— will be equipped with valuable information about their surroundings.

Not yet familiar with HPDs? Check out www.hpdcollaborative.org or visit www.ctpressroom.com to learn more about CertainTeed’s industry-first HPDs for its ceiling products.

 

Green Building Guru: Jason Kliwinski, Green Building Center

At the Green Builder Center exhibit (#2311), the concept of resilient design was top of mind. A recently published white paper by Jason Kliwinski, LEED Fellow, sheds important light on how “resiliency” plays a role in sustainable design. Specifically, Kliwinski says that to achieve resilient design, you must:

Plan ahead and expect the worst essentially. Thinking about how you will heat and cool your building without grid power, integrating storm water management strategies on your property and in your community to handle storm surges and to protect your property and lives, considering alternative means of transportation if you have to navigate closed or damaged roads or channel get fuel…

Are these considerations already apart of your planning process? If not, check out the full white paper at www.greenlivingandbuildingcenter.com.