Home Remodeling Month: A Time to Shine

Home-Remodeling-Projects-wpckiPinterest, Houzz, Facebook, Twitter — each and every day I see amazing home transformations that delight and inspire. I’m constantly in awe of the skill and craftsmanship behind these remodeling projects. And, while smaller scale projects are suitable for ambitious DIYers, there’s something to be said for hiring a professional remodeler and getting the job done right.

Both the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) issue a rally cry during the month of May to recognize the work of professional remodelers and encourage homeowners to tackle a long-awaited renovation or needed repair.

Coined “National Home Remodeling Month,” both NAHB and NARI offer a host of resources to help remodelers shine and boost their bottom line. From logos, to social media posts to press release templates, there’s a myriad of tools that remodelers can use in their local markets. All of these promotional materials offer a unique way for remodelers to sharpen their competitive edge.

Also, this is a great time for remodelers to revisit the annual Cost vs. Value Report published by Hanley Wood and share this valuable information with their customers. The report outlines the remodeling projects that result in the greatest return on investment. For example, here’s a rundown of a few high-ranking projects from the most recent report:

Type of Project Return on Investment
Entry Door Replacement 96.6%
Deck Addition 87.4%
Garage Door Replacement 83.7%
Attic Bedroom 83.4%
Vinyl Siding Replacement 78.2%

Overall, remodelers bring curb appeal, comfort and value to our homes and that’s certainly something to honor and recognize during the month of May. Do you have an interesting remodeling project currently underway? If so, share you story here!

 

Build Home Insurance Perks into Your Pitch

cit5glamourimagesmallWhether you’re a builder or an architect, you’re always looking for new ways to sell your homes to your clients. Here’s something unique to build into your pitch – the homeowners insurance benefits. Savings and extra perks go along with insuring a new house versus an old one. You can get a leg up on the competition by using a lesser known perk to your advantage.

To start off: simply buying new can help your clients save. Homes built within the last 10 years could qualify for a discount of up to 20%. Given that the average U.S. homeowners insurance premium exceeded $822 as of the end of December, the new discount could generate savings of up to $164 a year. Providers prefer new homes because they believe there is a lower risk of them incurring an expensive claim.

Other ways that new homes can earn your clients home insurance savings and help with your sales message include the following:  

New plumbing

Plumbing system failures are the leading source of home water losses, according to the Insurance Institute for Building and Home Safety (IBHS). It’s no wonder that home insurance providers wish to avoid plumbing malfunctions when the average claim per incident weighs in at more than $7,000, according to the Insurance Information Institute (III).

Updated plumbing systems in new homes form a major part of a moisture management strategy and can therefore earn your clients preferred home insurance policies, which generally come with lower premiums.

A modern HVAC system

Heating and cooling systems can be testy. In fact, heating equipment is the second leading cause of home fires, according to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). To avoid the approximate $5.8 billion dollars in damage that heating systems cause in fire damage every year, insurance carriers consider new HVAC systems a major factor in determining whether a homeowner qualifies for a preferred policy. New HVAC systems also typically work more efficiently and can save your clients 20% or more in utilities costs.

More fire safety

From 2007 to 2011, the U.S. experienced nearly 50,000 fires due to electrical malfunction and $1.5 billion in direct property damage, according to the NFPA. The average fire claim costs insurers in excess of $33,000, according to the III. Again, new wiring is a factor in qualifying for a preferred policy. Other anti-fire measures in new homes include smoke detectors, which can win owners premium discounts of up to 5% ($41 on that average premium cited above).

Roof stability

Roof damage from wind and hail costs an average of $7,177 per claim, so home insurance providers favor sturdy roofs. If your building project involves roofs that the carrier qualifies as impact-resistant,—UL class 3 or higher—your clients could get preferred status and qualify for lower premiums. Some materials that qualify are metal and concrete tile.

None of these savings are one-time price breaks: They can extend for years, which should increase their appeal to buyers. In fact, homeowners who go 10 years without filing a claim can win a discount of up to 20% on their premiums. New homes make it much easier to reach that 10-year threshold.

When speaking with potential buyers about the benefits of buying new, add home insurance discounts to your toolbox. You can get your clients focused on protecting their homes, while adding the benefits of lower monthly premiums. Doing so can help persuade clients to buy new – and to buy with you.

Guest Blogger Carrie Van Brunt-Wiley has been Community Manager for HomeownersInsurance.com since 2007. She is a native New Yorker with a background in journalism and professional writing.

 This guest blog post does not necessarily reflect the opinions of CertainTeed Corporation.

It is Spring Tune-Up Time for Your Home

Lucas Hamilton

Lucas Hamilton is Manager, Building Science Applications for CertainTeed Corporation

It is spring and we just celebrated the 42nd Anniversary of Earth Day. While you are contemplating changes you can make to your home and property to conserve energy or improve curb appeal in a re-heating real estate market, keep in mind that this is the perfect time to do a home inspection and make sure that your home is efficient, safe and in-keeping with the Earth Day ideals.

Here are a few places you should inspect:

  • Inspect your roof for missing or broken shingles or possible places where water could come in. If your roof is not ventilated properly you could have damage from ice dams. Nothing could be greener than making our existing resources last longer and your roof is the first line of defense.
  • Check your attic or crawl space to make sure that water is not coming in.  It is also a good time to see if you need to add additional insulation to your attic space. The attic is one of the easiest places in a home to add insulation and insulation prices are about as low as they get right now so no point in waiting.
  • Clean your gutters.  Make sure they are cleared for the rainy season. Leaves and dirt can build up in any season. Clogged gutters are one of the most efficient ways to redirect water back into your building once you have already shed it.
  • Tune up your air conditioner.  It is the prime time for specials from contractors. Making sure that your unit is working properly can help save on utility bills and actually improve your indoor air quality.
  • Check your walls and foundation for any cracks that could cause moisture infiltration. You must maintain your barriers.
  • Check the basement for mold. When the temperature gets above 41 degrees that is when mold is happy. If mold is present you will be able to smell it. If it smells bad it is bad.

If you have an older home it is critical to make upgrades and improvements when signs of weakness appear.  Taking care of simple repairs will save you money over time but will also make your home more competitive in the marketplace and make for a healthier habitat for you and your family.

Building Hope for the Future with Habitat for Humanity

We all know that homeownership is considered the cornerstone of the American dream.  But many of us take that dream for granted.  I was reminded of this when I attended the dedication and blessing of a home with Habitat for Humanity in Chester, Pennsylvania outside of Philadelphia.

As a corporate sponsor of what we have come to refer to as the “CertainTeed House” because of the many CertainTeed products incorporated into the building envelop of this two-family house, I participated in the dedication and blessing of the house.  The family, a single mother with two daughters who will occupy half of the house, seemed simultaneously overwhelmed and excited.

The group of family, friends, sponsors and supporters clustered into what would soon be the family’s living room as the Reverend began the dedication and blessing.  The group traveled from room to room with the family carrying a candle as each area was given a special blessing – from the kitchen where nourishment is prepared to the dining room where bread is broken and shared to the bedrooms where sleeping safe and secure is desired.  Once the blessing was completed, the keys were presented to the family marking the final transformation of this building from simply a house into a home.

It was beautiful!

But there was an added sense of pride that I felt standing in this completed house that would be the dream home for this family. Over ten weeks during the building of this house approximately 80 of my co-workers volunteered time on the site to help with the build.  The opportunity to gain hands-on experience with CertainTeed roofing shingles, housewrap, vinyl siding and railing, insulation and gypsum products was as valuable as the satisfaction of giving back to the community in this very special way.  In some cases it brought employees together whose paths would not cross at work and in other cases departmental teams used this as a teambuilding exercise.

In the end, it was a learning experience for all and a lesson in community that has no equal.

Cautionary Tale on Installing Vegetative Roofs

LiveRoof

While presenting a workshop last week in Northern New Jersey hosted by Grubb & Ellis, Inc., a property management firm, I engaged in a conversation with an architect about a learning experience he encountered while installing a vegetative or live Roof.  

Vegetative roofs have been utilized in Europe for about 25 years and are gaining popularity in the United States especially for commercial buildings. From a building science perspective the thing I like about live roofs is the natural property of plants when it comes to resisting solar heat gain from infrared radiation.  The albedo, which is the surface reflectivity of the sun’s radiation, plays a large part in the benefit of a live roof.

On the hottest day in the summer, the average surface temperature of living plants in direct sunlight is only two degrees greater than the temperature of the ambient air. If you measured the temperature of a dark surface it could be as much 20 to 30 degrees higher than the ambient air.  Since plants never get more than two degrees hotter than the ambient air it makes them the obvious cool roof. 

While we are seeing an increase in cool roofs in building design, we can’t lose sight of common sense.  Now back to the architect and his tale.

This architect explained that the construction on the project was delayed which meant that the vegetative roof was installed in the summer.  By the time the plants arrived to be installed on the roof structure it was July, the hottest and driest time of year in northern New Jersey.  As a result, the first three months of the roofs’ life required watering.  The architect never imagined that he would have to water his roof for three months.

The designers and contractors never considered in the scheduling that the vegetative roof would need support if installed at the hottest and driest time of year.  The installation of the living component could have been delayed to more appropriately suit the environmental conditions but the benefit to the building of the vegetative albedo would not have been realized when it was actually needed the most- in the mid and late summer. It’s a great example of one of the many trade-offs we have to evaluate when building sustainably.  

 

Lucas Hamilton

Lucas Hamilton is Manager, Building Science Applications at CertainTeed Corporation